I`m now Bald | Animated Story about Value of Health

I`m now Bald | Animated Story about Value of Health

My name is Evelyn, I’m 13 and I have no hair.

I’m gonna tell you how I live being bald.

I was born with pretty thick hair. Soб at my old pics I look like a cousin It from the Addams’ family. Other girls’ moms were jealous of my ponytails and braids.
I went to school having a low back рфш length which every girl dreamed about. They even invited me to get filmed in some ads and even to be a television broadcaster in kids’ programs. So, maybe you’ve seen me before on the kids TV shows.
When I turned 9, I started losing my hair. At first I paid no attention to that. It’s kinda natural — sometimes your hair fall out more, sometimes less.
Then my mom noticed a bald spot on my head and sounded the alarm. We thought it was just a lack of vitamin D — it’s hard to call our town a sunny one. But we saw the doctor anyway.
I had a blood test. When they got the results, I was said I had nothing serious. Also, they promised my hair would grow again. But it’s better to have a haircut in order to reduce the burden on my scalp.
Since that time, I started having a dyking as a hairstyle. I felt unusual, but pretty comfortable. It didn’t need any special treatment either.
But this pleasure was somewhat questionable because I kept getting bald. My thick hair was turning into thin one.
After a detailed survey I found out I have alopecia. In my case it’s a genetic disease. You just gradually lose your hair till you go completely bald.
I inherited that from my dad who got totally bald at 16. But he’s a man and it’s easier to overcome this for him.
We found out the diagnosis and it seemed like a half of the battle. We just had to figure out how to cure that. But the hope was lost when we were said that alopecia is untreatable. Well, it could be ceased a bit by hormones, but at the end you’re gonna lose all your hair anyway.
By that moment I had already lost like half of my hair. So I decided no to risk my own health. There is no point in risk for a few streaks.
I got some advice from my mom and we decided to shave me. That decision was difficult to make because in our society there are some, you know, «beauty standards». There is no place for bald girls there.
But my mom is a pretty wise woman. She showed me some pics of bald models and ordinary women who were still beautiful without their hair. I was impressed. I understood that you could be nice and charming despite being bald.
So, I went bald at 10. Lots of tears dropped down as well as a long way to pass to learn the self-acceptance.
The hardest part was school. Kids laughed at me, invented some insulting nicknames, and nobody wanted to hang out with me. It was good for me that the school year was about to end. I was looking forward to summer holidays and entering a new school.
During summer we found an Internet community of people suffering from hair loss and their siblings. I gained support there, met some adults with alopecia and I also learned how to protect myself from bullying.
Me and mom even left for an event organised by the community members, so I could knew those positive and nice people in real life. I was pleasantly surprised seeing pretty successful people among them. Every one of them was unique. There were doctors, musicians, models and even… a hairdresser!
That meeting fundamentally changed my attitude to my disease. I understood that nothing is impossible and the sky is limit — you just gotta have a goal in your life.
My parents gave me a wig as a gift for a new school year. I went to a new school where nobody knew about my… umm… thing. But that couldn’t last long.
By the time my classmates found out I had fake hair, I’ve already made friends and gained their support. But those who likes to make fun of others didn’t want to miss such an opportunity.
But I was ready to protect myself. Abusers left me alone but the classmates started respecting me and my circle of friends has expanded. I was elected as a school president soon.
By the way, some girls from my class are jealous when we go to the pool because it’s not painful for me to wear a swimming cap. And I can wash my head right before sleep. Next day I wouldn’t worry about looking shaggy at school. I don’t even need time to dry my hair.
But in fact, the world is much larger than school and I have to communicate off-site. I learned to ignore the eyes on me and whispering behind my back. That is nothing compared to some questions that may take me aback.
Sometimes strangers ask me if I can infect them, how many days I still have, if I’m ashamed of going outside and why I don’t stay at home. First, I was angry about that and I could be rude in response. Now I’m trying to be fun with that and I usually have a punch line like, “Oh, I’m sorry, I have a really rare and scary African virus. So I’m gonna come back to my chamber”. Their faces… It’s something.

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